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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 27, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines two lorry drivers are charged with dangerous driving offences after the m1 crash in which eight people were killed, a shift in brexit policy. labour says britain should stay in the single market and customs union for a period after the leaving the eu. the government has confusion. it restarts negotiations tomorrow. it seems to me they are in danger of wondering into a cliff edge. ours is about protecting jobs and working conditions. a minute silence has been held at the notting hill carnival in west london to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. also: thousands of people are rescued from rising floodwaters, as houston bears the brunt of tropical storm harvey. it's the most powerful storm to hit mainland us in a decade — destroying homes and businesses along the gulf of mexico. lewis hamilton celebrates his 200th formula one race with victory
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at the belgian grand prix, halving sebastian vettel‘s championship lead. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the drivers of two lorries involved in a collision on the m1 motorway that killed eight people have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving. four other passengers in the minibus that was crushed remain in hospital. andy moore reports. the minibus involved in yesterday's crash was carrying 12 people from the nottingham area down towards london. police said some of its passengers were visiting from india. one of those who died has been identified as cyriacjoseph, who was also known as benny. he was the owner of the minibus
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company, abc travels. he is understood to be a father of two from nottingham. on facebook, one friend paid tribute, saying "words cannot describe how helpful you are. "you are there when we need you. "you are my big brother. "we will miss your care." today, police gave an update on the four people hurt in the crash. they're still in hospital with serious injuries. yesterday, police said three of them were in a life—threatening condition. one of them is a five—year—old girl. both lorry drivers were arrested at the scene yesterday, and this morning they were charged, each of them with eight counts of causing death by dangerous driving, and four counts of causing serious injury by dangerous driving. one of them, ryszard masierak, who's 31 and from evesham, has also been charged with drink driving. he's been remanded in custody to appear in court tomorrow. the other driver, david wagstaff, who's 53 and from stoke—on—trent, has been bailed to appear before magistrates next month. andy moore, bbc news.
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our correspondent catriona renton has an update for us. some more details have come in, haven't they, particularly of the victims. we have received some further information about some of the victims of yesterday's ash. we heard about the first victim, the minibus owner now we have learned the names of three more of those who have died. they have been named by the it company they work for. we understand they have been contracted to work in nottingham where the minibus was travelling from. a spokesperson has said it is with deep regret and sadness that they
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confirm the passing away of three of their colleagues. they go on to say another of that colleagues was critically injured in the accident and we are praying for his speedy recovery. they say thoughts and prayers are with the families of all of those who lost their lives in the tragedy. they continue to invite —— provide assistance in the time of grief. two men have been charged by causing death through dangerous driving. —— with causing death. for the first time labour has committed to keeping the uk in the single market and customs union during a transition period after leaving the eu. writing in the observer, the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, said leaving both at once would be too risky. the shift in policy would mean continuing to accept the free movement of people after brexit. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. labour campaigned to remain.
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but since the result of the eu referendum in favour of leaving, the party has faced criticism that its policy on brexit was unclear. nowjeremy corbyn and his shadow brexit secretary, keir starmer, have agreed on their version of the way forward. a transitional period is, they say, essential. writing in the observer, keir starmer criticises the government's approach of constructive ambiguity and says there should be no mixed messages. a credible solution is needed to one of the most important issues facing britain's exit from the eu. that means, he says, we would seek to remain in a customs union with the eu and within the single market. it would mean we would abide by the common rules of both. labour hasn't said how long the proposed transitional period should last after the uk leaves the eu, only that it should be as short as possible but as long as necessary. when many labour mps return here to westminster
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in the next week or so, they may find themselves torn between supporting what many will see as a soft brexit policy and representing their constituents, a lot of whom voted overwhelmingly to leave the eu. long—term, keir starmer has suggested keeping the benefits of the single market with what he called more effective management of migration. some pro—europe labour mps want the party to go further. what people would now like to see, building on this important step forward, is for the labour party to commit to single market membership and the customs union after the transition period, after the uk has left the european union. the government has dismissed labour's policy, saying the party has no vision for britain post—brexit. their plan for a transitional period is now set, but the endgame for britain outside the eu under labour is still far from clear. jonathan blake, bbc news. and speaking in edinburgh, labour
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leaderjeremy corbyn explained why he believes these proposals are the sensible approach. this is a transitional arrangement he is suggesting that the government has confusion. it starts the negotiations tomorrow it seems they are in danger of wandering into a cliff edge brexit. ours is to protect jobs and cliff edge brexit. ours is to protectjobs and working conditions. to a cce pt protectjobs and working conditions. to accept free movement of people and payments to the eu will continue beyond brexit? we must work out what the arrangements are chewing the transition period to make sure we reach agreement on that. the priority has to be protecting jobs and understanding the needs of eu nationals who are living here. we have said that we, as a labour government can guarantee their rights to remain in britain and also recognise that many services would not be able to operate without eu nationals. how long do envisage a transitional arrangement going on?” transitional arrangement going on?|j don't know what links it will be. i
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think we should say as is necessary but make it time—limited. i hear the government is thinking in terms of two years. government is thinking in terms of two yea rs. we government is thinking in terms of two years. we would say is we need to reach an arrangement which protects a long—term trading relationship between britain and europe and jobs in this country. all the manufacturing industries in britain rely on a supply chain all across europe. could that mean staying in the customs union beyond that? we have to have an effective tariff free agreement with europe and we have to look at trading arrangements with the rest of the world. the priority has to be half oui’ world. the priority has to be half our trade is with europe and we must protect those jobs. let's get some reaction. joining me is labour mp frank field. thank you for taking time the sunshine to sunshine to speak to us. what is your reaction about labour clarifying its position and changing its position on brexit?
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i think the need to change it, at the moment the prime minister has seized the initiative and the country believes and understands that she will take us out of europe. they do not yet believe that of us and the labour party. we must match that. secondly, we must make sure that. secondly, we must make sure that we incorporate all their laws and conventions. thirdly, as a parliamentary system, in our own timing we check out those laws and regulations that don't suit us. also negotiate a safe haven so that we can conduct these negotiations at oui’ can conduct these negotiations at our own time so that those who think they have their little fingers on oui’ they have their little fingers on ourwindpipe they have their little fingers on our windpipe though they have not. isn't there a danger that those who support labour, vote labour, and voted for brexit, will be worried that the party they have supported
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is not committed to brexit as they saw it? i think the key thing, as a labourmp, the campaign saw it? i think the key thing, as a labour mp, the campaign to leave the eu is that we must match the confidence that the prime minister has gained with the electorate, that she will be leaving and taking the country out of the eu. we must match that in the voter's mind. at the same time we must convince the voters that, when this big build the prime minister has conceived comes through, or we are interested in is incorporating into our system the european laws and regulations and that we will then, in due process, oui’ that we will then, in due process, our third task, throw out those laws and regulations that don't seek for britain. while all of this is going on we need to establish a safe haven
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so on we need to establish a safe haven so that we forget about all of these timetables with months and years and all the rest. we're in it, if needs be, for the long haul. we will negotiate the very very best deal for britain and that people can keep faith with us and we will deliver that. the european union has made it very clear there is no negotiation. you're in the eu all you are out. you're in the eu all you are out. you can't not be in the single market and not have freedom of movement. they have made their position very clear. the key thing is that labour supporters voted for is that labour supporters voted for is freedom of movement were to stop the freedom of movement and get control over immigration. the judicial implements they have over laws in the uk, now you are saying, let's keep that going for a while and we do not know how long for. it could go on for much longer than two yea rs. could go on for much longer than two years. i am not saying... we're in negotiations was that you would
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expect the other side to say precisely what you and some of your other colleagues on the bbc keep pushing, that they have actually got the upper hand on this. we know what they keep reciting to us but what i am telling you, we win the battle here of hearts and minds. people know, never mind about all of this manoeuvring, we are going to take as out of the eu. that will happen in 18 months‘ time. we know that we will actually incorporate their laws and regulations. we know that we need a parliamentary procedure in which we can sort out what we want to keep and what we want to chuck out. fourthly, we slip their negotiating timetable by finding a safe haven which allows us to negotiate from a decision of strength rather than one, when are you need it because you are interviewing me, it is yourjob to do that. but we are serious about getting their very best
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negotiations, whatever the time limit is. if people can see progress, the idea that we are going to keep having a calendar where you, and other newscasters will be tearing the months after and to d—day whether we have baled or not, all of that i think is yesterday‘s news. we only report what the eu tells us. we do not make it up. is there a danger that this position... what has been announced today becomes permanent. jeremy corbyn has said he could not possibly answer the question of how long freedom of movement would continue. how long the things that people voted for, labour supporters voted for when it comes to brexit, how long they would continue for. what you did not say is thatjeremy is on a journey will stop where did he start and what is
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he saying today? i have not been on a journey. i campaigned for us to come out. people can keep the faith with the labour mps who campaigned to come out and know we are not doing any ratting or you turning or anything else. we‘re also intent on getting the very best deal for britain, whatever it takes and however long it takes. they did not vote on freedom of movement, did they? they voted against it. they did not. they also know there is no point establishing no freedom of movement if they do not have a border control system that does not control the borders. one thing we need to build as an advantage is a border control system so we can deliver on that pledge, make it a strength rather than saying in 18 months‘ time we can control our borders when everybody living knows he cannot control our borders now. why should we be able to do it in 18
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months? let‘s turn to an advantage. one thing of the many things we have to build up during the negotiations will be proper border controls. secondly, getting rid of people who actually deny the border controls and inviting them to leave. thirdly, we don‘t want to have the skills gap in this country. we want to build up during the months and years ahead of us during the months and years ahead of us and effective skills programmes that people in these very short blurb boutique apprentices, can make sure we have a skilled workforce so that as weak, over the months, control our borders, we will make sure there are no skills vacancies in this country. it is a whole package. the key thing in all of this is to convince people we are not kidding. we are not messing around. they are not trying to deceive them. we are committed to leaving above all. we have our head screwed on properly about how we should leave. thank you for your
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time. pleasure. a 51—year—old german woman has died from injuries she suffered in the van attack in barcelona. her death brings the number of people killed in the terror attacks to 16. 2a others are still being treated for injuries. a second man has been arrested by police investigating friday‘s attack outside buckingham palace. detectives say they have detained a 30—year—old man in west london on suspicion of being involved in the alleged terror incident. three police officers were injured on friday as they arrested a 26—year—old man brandishing a four foot sword who repeatedly shouted "allahu akbar". the headlines on bbc news: two lorry drivers have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving after 8 people were killed in a crash on the m1 near newport pagnell. labour has committed to the first time for keeping uk in the single market, the customs union. they say
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to avoid the economy falling off a cliff edge. a minute's silence is held at the notting hill carnival to pay tribute to the victims of the nearby grunfeld tower. —— grenfell. president trump says he will travel to texas in the coming days to see the damage caused by tropical storm harvey. severe flooding is now the main concern in the state. in the houston area the floods have been described as ‘catastrophic‘ by the national weather service. buildings have been badly damaged and people have been forced from their homes. sarah corker reports. first came the 130mph winds. now torrential rains are expected to inundate south texas for days. the national hurricane centre has warned people to prepare for life—threatening flooding. parts of the city of galveston are already underwater and the flooding could get much worse, with 30 inches of rain forecast. all the streets going down that side
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are completely flooded. we saw somebody‘s car floating earlier. it‘s bad out here, guys. we moved our water and food and vehicles inside and the generator. hurricane harvey made landfall on friday as a category four hurricane. it‘s now been downgraded, but left behind a trail of destruction. this is rockport — homes have been flattened and some people are feared to be trapped. tens of thousands have now fled the area. now that the hurricane has come onshore our primary concern remains dramatic flooding. one of the top focal points we are concerned about is ongoing rescue and recovery. we want to do everything we possibly can to keep people out of rising water. but those rescue efforts are being hampered by strong winds and severed power lines.
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more than a quarter of a million people are without electricity. at this point of time, we don‘t have electricity, we don‘t have water, we don‘t have a sewer, and a lot of our resources are tied up to find out what‘s going on. several of the main thoroughfares that come through here are flooded. meanwhile, the coast guard has rescued 18 people from stricken vessels. this footage shows four people being pulled to safety from a sinking tugboat. while harvey may have lost strength as it moved inland, it‘s forecast to linger over south texas, and more damage is expected from heavy rain still to come. sarah corker, bbc news. the mayor of houston, sylvester turner has given an update on the flooding situation in the city. there have been numerous reports of streets and houses flooding. we all know that. most major thoroughfares
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are impassable. several hundred structural flooding reports and we expect that number to continue to rise pretty dramatically. between hpd and the houston fire department we have received more than 2000 calls for rescues on 911. i know people are trying to reach 911. they may not be getting a response. i understand that. there are a lot people who are calling. let me ask, let‘s give preference to the life threatening calls. if, for example, if you are stranded in your vehicle but you are in a safe place or a dry place, let‘s give preference to those who are in a situation at their home where the water is rising very quickly and they need our assistance, a life—threatening call. a 31—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a young boy in wythenshawe in greater manchester.
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police were called to a report of a incidentjust after midnight, and discovered the body of the youngster when they entered the property. officers also learned that a man and a woman had left the house to go to hospital. the woman is being treated for serious injuries in hospital while the man is being questioned in custody. police were called to a previous domestic incident at the home two days ago. police have arrested a man on suspicion of aggravated burglary after an elderly woman was badly beaten in lancashire. the 88 year—old was asleep at her home in chorley in the early hours of saturday morning when she was woken by a man who attacked her and demanded money. five climbers have died and a sixth has been injured in an accident in the austrian alps. the accident happened at a height of more than 6,000 feet. authorities have said that the exact cause is unclear but it appears that the six climbers were roped together when they fell. iraq‘s military says it has retaken almost all of the last of so—called islamic state stronghold
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inside the country. tal afar, which is close to the syrian border, was captured by the militants three years ago. it became the final major objective for iraqi—led forces after i—s fighters were driven out of mosul earlier this year. our correspondent hanan razek has been to the liberated centre of tal afar, and sent this report: it is a ghost town. one week after the battle to retake tal afar, all you can see is destruction, empty houses, and the remains left behind by the so—called islamic state. here at the heart of tal afar city, you can see the iraqi flag is now on top of the castle, which is bombed back in 2014. seeing the flag here means that this part of town has been recaptured by security forces. a victory, to many, has come earlier than expected. fighting is here has been easier than expected. many of the group‘s fighters fled before
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the military operation started. as for civilians, there is no trace of them. translation: most of the civilians have fled. the local terrorists have fled as well. foreign fighters managed to send their families out towards the mountains but they stayed inside to fight. most of the fighters here were foreigners from former soviet union countries and from south—east asia. after the smooth advancing for the iraqi forces so far, the military operation may be over soon, but there is another controversial battle ahead for this town that was once home for minority ethnic groups like turkmens. it is not clear yet what the future holds here, where sectarian disputes are very possible. hanan razek, bbc news. the notting hill carnival is in full
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swing in west london. it‘s the 51st time the event has been held, although this year it has been overshadowed by the grenfell tower tragedy. at 3pm a minute‘s silence was observed in memory for those killed in the fire which broke out in june. some of those who marked the silence were local firefighters. the route of the carnival passes the site, in west london. more than1 million people are expected to attend the carnival today and tomorrow. we can cross live to our correspondent who is in nottingham hill. they saw the silence and the celebrations. there has been much celebrations. there has been much celebrations. it has got a lot busier along the parade route. the celebrations today started off with a ceremony, a multi—faith prayer and gathering. doves were released as a
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mark of respect to those who were pa rt mark of respect to those who were part of the grenfell tower tragedy. more than a million people are expected to take part in the carnival. today is the first day, the first carnival. today is children‘s day. we are expecting to see lots of floats go past with a lot of kids dressed up in a lot of costu mes lot of kids dressed up in a lot of costumes before they getjudged at the end. only an hour and a half left. the metropolitan police latest update on the number of arrests is there have been six arrests. just over my shoulder, i don‘t know if you can see the fire station, there was a minute‘s silence about three o‘clock. crowds gathered around firefighters who stood around to pay tribute to their colleagues who had to go into the burning tower in june. thank you for that. much more
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on the bbc news website. swiss officials have called off a search for eight people missing since a huge landslide struck near the border with italy on wednesday, acknowledging they were likely to be buried under millions of tons of rock. police have warned they are expecting more landslides in the remote valley. tim neilson reports. high in the swiss alps, this is what remains of the small village of bondo. two landslides in the space of three days have buried homes, vehicles and people. this dramatic footage shows an entire mountainside collapsing on wednesday, sending a torrent of mud and rocks for five kilometres down the valley. 100 residents were taken to safety, but eight hikers from germany, austria and switzerland are still missing. the search for them has been abandoned. translation: it became clear that the eight missing people
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were caught in the back path of the val bondasca, hit by a landslide. to be clear, a landslide like this travels at a speed of around 250 kilometres an hour. bondo is close to the italian border in the graubunden region of switzerland. it is known to be at risk of landslides when water overflows from the high alpine lakes. and on friday, as had been feared, a second smaller landslide, a river of boulders. diggers brought in for the initial clean—up were swept away. and this was once one of the area‘s main roads. swiss police say in places the mud and rock is tens of metres deep and geologists warn the mountain still possesses a threat to the communities living below. tim neilson, bbc news. the queensferry crossing which links the lothians and fife in scotland
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will be officially opened by the queen next week. the bridge cost £1.3 billion and is the longest crossing of its kind in the world. our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, has been to see it, as the finishing touches are made. rising out of the waters of the forth, the queensferry crossing linking edinburgh and fife. the construction of this bridge took six years to complete and its design means it should stay open to traffic no matter how strong the winds get during the often bad winter weather. it‘s a very technical bridge and a lot of the technical aspects are invisible, you can‘t see them. the foundations, for example, are probably the most dramatic and the most difficult to achieve on the whole project and i think people don‘t see that. they do see the magnificence of quite a beautiful bridge. the narrow crossing has a striking cantilever design,
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which catches the light while the bridge soars above the landscape below. it is the tallest bridge in the uk, as well as the longest of its type in the world. 15,000 people have been involved in this huge construction project. last—minute work is continuing to get the motorway crossing ready for traffic which in just a few days‘ time will start using this, the third bridge on this part of the forth. lorna gordon, bbc news, at the queensferry crossing. weather with alina jenkins. hello. two faces to the weather today. for many it has been a lovely sunday. lots of cloud in the north
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and west, also scotland and northern ireland and north—western parts of wales will stop by and large in the sunshine and we have seen clearer skies. cloud continuing to build across northern ireland. in scotland heavy outbreaks of rain with a strengthening breeze at the rain arriving in northern ireland as we head towards storm. temperatures on a par with last night. bank holiday monday tomorrow. an unsettled day across northern ireland and scotland. a squeeze in the isobars representing a strengthening, gusty wind. afairly representing a strengthening, gusty wind. a fairly unsettled and cool feeling day. lots of cloud across north west england and the west of wales. in much of england dry with plenty of sunshine and doctor bridges could be up to 28 celsius. a different feel in scotland and northern ireland given the strength of the wind and outbreaks of rain. the rain will start to clear from the north west of scotland through the north west of scotland through the day. there may be the odd spot of rain in the north of wales.
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across much of england dry, warm, if not hot. potentially we could see highs of 28 celsius in the south—east and is to parts of england. if we do it will be the warmest late bank holiday weather on record. the rain in northern ireland and scotland is associated with this front. on tuesday it will tend to weaken. maybe the odd spot of rain on tuesday morning which will ease. for most of the country a cloudy affair. for most of the country we are in fresher conditions on tuesday. still holding onto some warmth and humidity in the far south east of the country for the looking ahead into wednesday we are attacked from two sides by errors of low pressure for that this one coming in from the atlantic, another from the near continent. that means a messy picture. the details will be tricky at this stage. there will be outbreaks of rain. will firm up on
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the detail in the coming days with temperatures between 16 and 20. goodbye. a the hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... two lorry drivers have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving in connection with a collision on the m1 near milton keynes in which eight were killed. labour has committed, for the first time, to keeping the uk in the single market and customs union during a transition period after leaving the eu, to avoid the economy falling off a "cliff edge". a minute‘s silence has been observed at the notting hill carnival to pay tribute to the victims of grenfell fire. earlier organisers held a remembrance ceremony to open the festivities. president trump announces he is to travel to texas, as the remnants of hurricane harvey continue to cause catastrophic flooding across the state. more than a thousand people have been rescued in the city of houston. let us catch up with all the bank
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all the way given support and formula 1. we will start with football. chelsea beat everton 2—0 today making it two wins from three matches for antonio co nte after wins from three matches for antonio conte after the surprise opening—day defeat to bernet. alvaro marathas setup cesc fabregas for the first goal and scored the second himself against a below par everton. i think the only negative aspect is that we need to be more clinical, we need to try and score and close the game, definitely. but, we must be pleased, because the players performed very well with great concentration and finish the game with a clean sheet. yes, i think that we saw a lot of positive things. it is difficult to nail
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down, after a tough week, it was difficult to play today and they showed commitment and that was until the last second of the game and that is what we need, to get a better result, but chelsea were the better team and the more quality team. 0k, and you know if you play in five or six days, three really tough games and you need to travel, you cannot do it with 11 players, you need more in that situation. we were a little bit unlucky but we missed six or seven players, everybody available, it is much easier to handle this week. it finished one all between west brom and stoke. jay rodriguez had put west brom in front. a couple of other latest scores for you. arsenal are playing liverpool at anfield — peter crouch was able to head home.
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i don‘t think they had a clear—cut chance. it was disappointing in respect of the goal that we scored. j. respect of the goal that we scored. j,i respect of the goal that we scored. j, ithink respect of the goal that we scored. j, i think coming of microbicide gave us another goal—scorer in the team, which we need and when we scored, i know we had a couple of chances afterwards. jake should have played solomon. i think that would have finished the game. credit to us, we kept on trying to change the point of attack and changing play, good rotation, we made a couple of changes, which i think helped our creative spark at the top end of the pitch and they put a good ball in, a testing ball for the keeper and their centre half, they made a little bit of a hash at it and peter crouch knocked it over the line. we
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are grateful for the points, i think we we re are grateful for the points, i think we were the team that was trying to be progressive, trying to win the game, but in the end, it is a better performance, better result than we had last year and we will take it. liverpool are 4—0 up at home to arsenal thanks to roberto firmino. spurs are playing their second premier league home game against burnley. dele alli put them ahead early in the second half. in the scottish premiership, rangers are up to sixth place in the table, five points behind aberdeen as they won 3-1 at points behind aberdeen as they won 3—1 at ross county. they were already one goal up when the county goalkeeper had a moment to forget. he looked like he was in control of the situation but allowed him to get one up and put rangers 2—0 ahead. one was pulled back but rangers wrapped up the match with two
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minutes to go. an important result for them after two home games without a win. dundee ended a run of five scottish premier league defeats with a one draw against hibs. kevin holt put them ahead after less than one minute but steven whittaker who conceded that penalty made amends by finding anthony stokes whose shot went off his toe. heads are fifth place while dundee are of michael at the bottom of the table. the first two balls of the day. the windies trail and added 98 runs for the first innings lead of 169 and in reply, england last alistair cook but mark stillman made a maiden test 50 as he looked to cement his ashes spot. he was bowled by shannon gabriel. england were 94—3, 75 runs
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behind. a short while ago they were 160 macro three. sebastian vettel‘s lead — in the f1 drivers‘ championship — is down to seven points... lewis hamilton equalled michael schumacher‘s record. he went on to finish ahead of his title rival. lewis hamilton came here needing to close the gap on sebastien vettel in the world championship and he did just that. this was no time to relax. lewis hamilton and sebastien vettel started first and second and back continued for much of the race. as they kept a clean, others could not. the force india‘s car is avoided and shunned as at hamilton and sebastien vettel were in a class of their own,
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the pair behind fancied round two. sergio perez forced this driver against the wall. the safety car closed everything back up. sebastien vettel had his best opportunity to pass his championship rival, he had the best tyres and the slipstream, he has not quite enough power to make it stick. this was hamilton‘s 200th race and he knows how to win them by now. he closes the gap to sebastien vettel at the top of the standings to seven points and with the now coming thick and fast, little chance to relax from here on in. lewis hamilton understandably delighted with his work this weekend, he has been faultless from start to finish. sebastien vettel was more circumspect in the postrace press co nfe re nce was more circumspect in the postrace press conference but we have not got to wait long for this battle to reserve. it is the italian grand prix just next week, the home of ferrari, how can sebastien vettel bounceback? andrew leads the motogp championship after winning the
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motogp at silverstone. marc marquez lost his place at the top of the standings when his honda broke down with seven laps to go. he tipped the lead and valentino rossi with three la ps lead and valentino rossi with three laps left and held on to take the chequered flag. cal crutchlow was in fourth place. chris froome has taken another big step towards adding their welter espanyol to another big step towards adding their welter espa nyol to his another big step towards adding their welter espanyol to his title. he extended his lead over his nearest rival, the colombian to 6.36 seconds. the team sky rider made the breakfor victory seconds. the team sky rider made the break for victory with a few hundred yards to go. one of the richest fights in the wonders of, floyd mayweather beat martial arts champion karen mcgregor in the tenth round making it a perfect career record of 50 fights. more from our
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correspondent. 50 wins, no defeats. floyd mayweatherjunior confirmed his position as one of the all—time greats in a fight that surpassed expectations. with just over a minute remaining in the tenth round, the dominance of the man who refers to himself as "tbe", the best ever, proved too much for conor mcgregor, with the referee stopping the contest. i want to go out with a bang. i told you guys there‘d be blood, sweat and tears, and i told you... he was a hell of a fighter, standing up. kind of shocked me. there's only one conor mcgregor! a sense of hope, anticipation and excitement had built throughout the day, with irish fans turning the desert city green. and floyd mayweather wasn‘t without support either. 49 try and 49 fill. he‘s going to be fit tonight. believe that. when the bell rang for the first round, mcgregor emerged all guns blazing, catching mayweather with a number of powerful shots. the irishman had claimed for weeks that he was ready to shock the world, and with three rounds gone, some began to wonder if he would deliver on his promise. but in his first professional boxing contest, the pace and skills
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of mayweather ground the irishman down, and he visibly tired. he came in hands up towards your forehead, dipped in the forehead on the chest, and started to fight that kind of fight. i didn't anticipate that. three game changes in the fight. that's what a true champion does. by the ninth round, mcgregor‘s legs began to wobble, clinging to his opponent and the ropes for survival. and the next round saw the end of a fight that has intrigued and repulsed in equal measure, with all its controversies and the amount of money involved. some believe this would be a farce, it was far from it, but the controversies remain. the fight was unapologetic —— michael was unapologetically put on for the money. it was enjoyable and a great learning experience. i am very happy with that. two of sports great showman delivered the entertainment, but with the cheques cashed and the hype at an end, the circus has now left town. richard conway, bbc news, las vegas. liam heath finished a canoe sprint. he won his event in the czech republic and now holds the olympic, world and european titles. the olympic champion crossed the line in under 3a seconds. olympic champion crossed the line in
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under 34 seconds. it is absolutely incredible. how the pinnacle of our sport. everyone is participating, eve ryo ne sport. everyone is participating, everyone is giving it a go. it is definitely one to take off the list andi definitely one to take off the list and i have ticked everything off the list. and the euro hockey championship, england‘s men beat the germans to secure a bronze medal. they come back from a goal down to saying that i could claim their first major medal since 2011. england counter from their own first major medal since 2011. england counterfrom their own half while germany were searching for an equaliser. england also secured third in the women‘s competition. that was on saturday. it was important not to feel sorry for ourselves. we come back and we go again. still medals to play for. in the past we have not proven ourselves properly. we have been down at the end of the tournament
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and we pride yourself on our fitness and we pride yourself on our fitness and this is when big games are a won. we went and did it. in the last hour, the netherlands were crowned men‘s hockey champions as they beat belgium. that is all sports are now. but the headlines on bbc news: to lorry drivers have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving. eight people were killed on the crash in the m —— on the m1. labour has committed for the first time to keeping the uk in the single market and customs union during the transition period after leaving the eu to avoid the economy as they say falling off a cliff edge. a minute
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of silence is held at the notting hill carnival to pay tribute to the victims of the nearby grenfell tower. now its time for meet the author. the journalist and writer jonathan freedland talks tojim naughtie about his book "to kill the president". on the cover of sam bourne‘s latest thriller, to kill the president, it says this: "the unthinkable has happened. "the united states has elected a volatile demagogue as president." well, readers may suspect that they know what‘s coming, but of course, we don‘t know who he is. he has no name in the book. just that there‘s enough danger for some of those around him to have to face a troubling moral dilemma. well, sam bourne is the guardian columnist jonathan freedland. he has long since outed himself as the author. welcome. some of your readers may find the setup in this
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novel eerily familiar. does that make it easier or harder to write? well, in some ways harder, because this is meant to be and is avowedly fiction. it‘s an alternative present. but of course the reader is going to have recent and current events in their mind. so you have to sort of ride that and use that to your advantage, and yet also insert things that will be wholly unfamiliar, so the heroine of the story, the character called maggie costello who has appeared in a couple of earlier sam bourne novels, irish—born, very idealistic, principled woman who worked for the previous president, who was this widely admired figure around the world, and now has held on, working for this much more unpopular president. so she is at the centre of it, she is a wholly fictional character. but the universe around her, i‘m aware that people are going to be bringing things to it that they know from the real world. well, you know perfectly well what they‘re going to bring to it.
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they‘re going to say this is donald trump. now, i mean, is it donald trump, or is it not donald trump? so, the president is never named. he‘s a fictional creation. and i think that‘s important, because you wouldn‘t be able to set all these other hares running. so, you know, for example, at the centre of the story are these two lieutenants to the president, loyal partisans for their party, who find themselves frankly appalled by the man they are serving, have come to the conclusion that he‘s a menace not only to america but to the world. and those people, the backgrounds they have, in this novel, they‘re the defence secretary, they‘re the chief of staff. they don‘t map onto the real defence secretary, the real chief of staff. so what you‘re doing is creating this alternative universe, this alternative world. but at the centre of it obviously are going to be things that people will find familiar. we don‘t want to give away the whole plot, and the central moral dilemma that unfolds as the story goes on. but you can set the scene for us at the beginning, i think, without spoiling it for anyone. yes, so the book opens with the president launching a nuclear strike against north korea. remember i wrote this book many months ago, before any of the current events had happened, but that is a quirk of the timing.
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he launches a nuclear strike against north korea and china after a war of words with the north korean leader, and that is narrowly averted really by the ingenious intervention of quite a low—level person who narrowly averts that strike. it‘s a fascinating moment, because it gets us into the whole question of whether there‘s a machine that is irrevocable once it starts, or whether it can be stopped. one of the fascinating things of parts of the research i did for this book was about the nuclear authority of the president. it turns out it‘s the least checked power of all the powers and american president has. the right to, or the power, to launch a nuclear assault, one that could end civilisation and the human race, there‘s no restraint. there‘s no filter on him. once he or she decides to do it, they simply have this aide, this quite low—level military aide who walks around with a briefcase manacled to the wrist which has the nuclear codes in it. he gets the codes from the aide, calls up a number in the pentagon war room,
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simply confirms his identity using those codes, and then he can give the order. the defence secretary is not there, the head of the army is not there, the chairman of the joint chiefs is not there. it‘s up to the president. he‘s a nuclear monarch with this power, and that is what sets this plot, this story, in motion. but what the plot then explores is whether the military mind and the political mind has the flexibility to say in those circumstances, we must do something. even if it is something morally as difficult and dangerous as the launching of a nuclear strike itself. well, that‘s right. at the heart of this book, i hope, are a series of these kind of moral dilemmas for the players involved. figures in the white house. the president himself is actually more or less offstage for most of this novel. it‘s about the people who serve him, and the dilemmas they wrestle with. and there‘s one right at the very beginning, can you thwart a presidential order? what will it take? but from then on, the even larger dilemma, which confronts the two people who work for him, and which is discovered
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by our heroine, maggie costello, is that they begin to conclude that the man that they have taken an oath to serve is a menace to the world. and there they begin to wrestle with, where does your responsibility lie in that situation? as a good patriot, is it your duty to serve the commander—in—chief, or should you, if you really have concluded he‘s a danger to the world, seek to remove him? and of course they explore the legal avenues first. in a sense, we‘ve been there before in the nixon presidency, because although what was at stake was simply the clinging on to power, it wasn‘t the possibility of a nuclear strike or anything like that, at least as far as we know. but there was a question raised among some of those around him as to whether his travails and horror of the position he was in had unbalanced him. and if it had, was there anything anyone could do about it? well, it‘s absolutely right. and i‘m glad you mention it, partly because the characters themselves refer to nixon and the so—called madman strategy. this is where he deputed his secretary of state, henry kissinger, to go round the world saying
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to world leaders, nixon‘s a bit crazy, you know. he‘s just crazy enough to do this. which nixon encouraged this strategy, because he believed it would make them fear him more, and therefore accommodate him with peace in vietnam and that kind of thing. but i‘m particularly glad you mentioned nixon, partlyjust because it comes from that era of the early ‘70s where not only was nixon and watergate going on, but it spawned the conspiracy political thriller. and, you know, i had no role in this, but one thing i love about this book is the cover. and the cover is absolutely a ‘70s—era sort of cover design. it could be day of the jackal or three days of the condor, which were thrillers i grew up with and loved. and the nixon era really incubated an atmosphere where people were ready to believe that the president was somehow a danger, and therefore buy into those kinds of scenarios. some people will think either looking at this book, just looking at the cover, or reading it, that this is a bit rich. you can‘t bear donald trump, so you‘ve written a book portraying him, albeit through an unnamed president in these pages, as somebody who is about to blow up the world.
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and they say, come on, if you believe that, write it, put your name on it and answer questions, rather than suggesting that it can happen. how do you answer that? well, jonathan freedland is denouncing trump regularly in the column i write as a newspaper journalist, i‘m sort of commentating on that. this was a different issue that i wanted to wrestle with, which was this question, the what if question. you know, i think all thriller writers will say, the two most useful words are what if. you take what‘s going on in the real world, and then you knock it on a stage, and you think, what if this then happened? and the what if for me was, what if you served somebody like that, and you yourself, not a hostile guardian journalist, but you yourself, a loyal member of the president‘s party who had sworn the oath to serve him, you yourself came to the conclusion he was dangerous? that‘s what i wanted to explore, and i think, you know, the day of the jackal, and i‘ve been very pleased a couple of critics have compared it to that, was about a named president in charles de gaulle.
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jeffrey archer wrote shall we tell the president?, in which teddy kennedy was imagined in an assassination scenario. so i think there is a kind of sub—genre that does this. but to me, the reality and this novel are separate. they may be separate, but the key to a novel like this, you mentioned day of the jackal, you mentioned three days of the condor, the key is that the reader has to believe that this is not fantasy, that it could come to this. if they don‘t believe that, they‘d probably give up after five pages. yeah, i think there is something in that. and i think one of the things that‘s interesting getting the reader reaction so far, and it‘s not been very long, is this idea that this seems plausible, that the danger, the sort of stakes that are in their mind as a reader, are because they look at the real world, and they think, a scenario not the same as this, not identical to this, is plausible. and i think one of the things that the big surprises that have confronted you and me as journalists this year is they‘ve made all kinds of scenarios that would once have seemed fantastical now seem plausible.
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and therefore i think it makes readers able to regard a story like this as plausible, because the real world itself is throwing up fantastical things all the time. jonathan freedland, sam bourne, author of to kill the president, thank you very much. thank you. for many it has been a lovely sunday. lots of cloud in the north and west, also scotland and northern ireland and north—western parts of wales will stop by and large in the sunshine and we have seen clearer skies. cloud continuing to build across northern ireland. in scotland heavy outbreaks of rain with a strengthening breeze at the rain arriving in northern ireland as we head towards storm. temperatures on a par with last night. bank holiday monday tomorrow.
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an unsettled day across northern ireland and scotland. a squeeze in the isobars representing a strengthening, gusty wind. a fairly unsettled and cool feeling day. lots of cloud across north west england and the west of wales. in much of england dry with plenty of sunshine and doctor bridges in much of england dry with plenty of sunshine and temperatures could be up to 28 celsius. a different feel in scotland and northern ireland given the strength of the wind and outbreaks of rain. the rain will start to clear from the north west of scotland through the day. there may be the odd spot of rain in the north of wales. across much of england dry, warm, if not hot. potentially we could see highs of 28 celsius in the south—east and is to parts of england. if we do it will be the warmest late bank holiday weather on record. the rain in northern ireland and scotland is associated with this front. on tuesday it will tend to weaken.
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maybe the odd spot of rain on tuesday morning which will ease. for most of the country a cloudy affair. we are in fresher conditions on tuesday. still holding onto some warmth and humidity in the far south east looking ahead into wednesday we are attacked from two sides by errors of low pressure for that this one coming in from the atlantic, another from the near continent. that means a messy picture. the details will be tricky at this stage. there will be outbreaks of rain. will firm up on the detail in the coming days with temperatures between 16 and 20. goodbye. this is bbc news. i‘m chris rogers. the headlines at six. two lorry drivers are charged with causing death by dangerous driving, after eight people were killed in the m1 crash. a change in policy on brexit, labour says britain should stay in the single market and customs union for a period after the leaving the eu.
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a minute‘s silence has been held at the notting hill carnival in west london to remember the victims of the grenfell tower fire. good evening and welcome to bbc news. in a moment we will have more on our top story on the m1 crash
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